[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.124.106. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 1949

PSYCHOSOMATIC SYMPTOMS RESULTING FROM THE IMPACT OF WARObservations in Civilian Medical Practice

Author Affiliations

BEVERLY HILLS, CALIF.

Am J Dis Child. 1949;77(6):703-708. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1949.02030040718001
Abstract

SINCE society has become conscious of and concerned with the health of its people, it has recognized that war acts as an extremely deleterious agent. War produces lack of food, lack of shelter, lack of clothing, lack of medicine and lack of hygiene. War's effect on health, therefore, is generally expressed in terms of these physical causes.

Only since the first World War has any scientific interest been taken in the effect of the emotional disturbances of war on the physical well-being of the people involved. Even so, only superficial attention was paid to this aspect of war. Generally, when emotional disturbances were mentioned, it was to explain the causes of war and the causes of aberrations in behavior, either of the individual person, or of a social, economic, civil, racial or religious mass or group. But that the emotions may exert a profound influence on the physical health of

×