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Article
June 1950

EVOLUTION OF NEUROLOGIC SIGNS OF EARLY ANTERIOR POLIOMYELITIS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Nervous and Mental Diseases, Northwestern University Medical School.

Am J Dis Child. 1950;79(6):973-987. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1950.04040010992001
Abstract

THE DATA from which descriptions of the neurologic signs of early poliomyelitis have been derived have been obtained chiefly from occasional irregularly spaced examinations of large numbers of patients, each at some different time from the onset of the disease. It was thought that a more accurate description would result from frequent regularly spaced examinations both day and night during the early stage of poliomyelitis.

Accordingly, eleven neurologists were rotated in tours of duty of six hours during the day and night for thirty days in the Municipal Contagious Disease Hospital (Chicago). Frequent examinations of each patient were made from the time of entrance to the hospital following the diagnosis or presumption of acute anterior poliomyelitis. This resulted in the examination of a pool of patients—at first, the few who were admitted on the first day and this number increased by subsequent admissions. During the period of thirty days the

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