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Article
November 1950

USE OF PHENURONE® IN CONVULSIVE DISORDERS IN CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Pediatrics, Mayo Clinic.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1950;80(5):719-724. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1950.04040020733001
Abstract

IN RECENT years a number of compounds have been found which are anticonvulsant in action on animals having convulsions induced by electroshock or by substances such as pentylenete (metrazol®) and on patients having convulsive attacks. One such substance is phenacetylurea (phenurone® Abbott; phenacetylcarbamide, Abbott). Everett and Richards showed that this drug suppressed experimentally produced convulsions in mice and that its toxicity when administered to cats and dogs was low. The lethal dose was found to be 3 to 5 Gm. per kilogram of body weight in all species tested.

Gibbs, Everett and Richards1 have discussed the therapeutic use of phenacetylurea in a group of 90 epileptic patients. Fifty per cent of the patients were maintained free of seizures or were greatly improved, while the remaining 50 per cent were not benefited. The amount of drug used daily for adults was 1.5 Gm. (minimum) to 5.0 Gm. (maximum) given in

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