June 06, 2011

Adding Fuel to the FireIncreasing Evidence for Developmental Toxicity of Indoor Solid Fuel Combustion

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Departments of Pediatrics and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, and the Northwest Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.


Copyright 2011 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.2011

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):565-566. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.6

The importance of the adverse effects of air pollution on children's health cannot be ignored. In particular, remarkably high levels of exposure to indoor air pollution have been documented in settings where solid fuels, including coal or biomass (such as wood, dung and crop residues), are burned for heating or cooking.1 Such fuels are used by more than half the world's population.