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Editorial
January 2016

Role of Serum Procalcitonin in Identifying Young Febrile Infants With Invasive Bacterial InfectionsOne Step Closer to the Holy Grail?

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California–Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento
  • 2Department of Pediatrics, University of California–Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento
  • 3Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit
  • 4Department of Emergency Medicine, Children’s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit
JAMA Pediatr. 2016;170(1):17-18. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.3267

Fever is one of the most common reasons for infants to present to the emergency department (ED).1 Among febrile infants younger than 3 months presenting to EDs, approximately 5% to 9% will have urinary tract infections, 2% will have bacteremia, and less than 0.5% will have bacterial meningitis.2,3 Hereafter, these will be referred to as “the big 3” infections with the latter 2 infections termed invasive bacterial infections. We will avoid using the term serious bacterial infections for all 3, as this implies an equivalent level of severity.

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