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Editorial
October 2016

Applying the Australian New Zealand Cooperative on Outcomes in Staphylococcal Sepsis Pediatric Data to the US PopulationIs It Half a World Away?

Author Affiliations
  • 1Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
JAMA Pediatr. 2016;170(10):934-936. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.1970

In this issue of JAMA Pediatrics, McMullan and colleagues1 report a large epidemiologic study of 1153 Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) cases among children in the Australian New Zealand Cooperative on Outcomes in Staphylococcal Sepsis (ANZCOSS) study. This is an ambitious and well-designed study from which significant findings include a higher incidence of SAB among indigenous children in Australia and New Zealand, as well as higher mortality when vancomycin is used for definitive treatment of infection. Notably, only 13.2% of infections in this study population were secondary to methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA). The investigators should be applauded for this impressive work. The study population and microbiology, however, differ from those seen in the United States; I wish to discuss how their findings may be applied to practice in the United States.

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