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Editorial
December 06, 2010

The Conundrum of Combination Vaccines

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Child Health Evaluation and Research Unit (CHEAR), Division of General Pediatrics, Division of General Medicine, and Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(12):1171-1172. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.219

One of 5 pediatricians in the United States does not use combination vaccines on a regular basis.1 This lack of uniformity is a problem, because in the context of an increasingly more complex set of national vaccine recommendations for newborns to 6-year-olds,2 combination vaccines help children get vaccinated in a more timely fashion.3 As a result, during the past decade, use of combination vaccines has become the standard of quality and the de facto standard of care.4 The fact that one-fifth of pediatricians do not meet this standard1 is an opportunity for quality improvement on a national scale.5

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