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Article
March 1951

PREVENTION OF MINOR SKIN IRRITATION (MILIARIA) AND IMPETIGO IN THE NEWBORN

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.; BERLIN, N. Y.; ROCHESTER, N. Y.
From the Department of Pediatrics of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and the Pediatric Service of the Genesee Hospital.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1951;81(3):329-334. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1951.02040030339003
Abstract

THE PURPOSE of this paper is to assess the value of a new antiseptic compound hexachlorophene, in preventing infection of the skin of newborn infants.

The occurrence of impetigo and various minor skin irritations, grouped, for want of a better name, under the term "miliaria," is a perennial problem in almost every obstetric and pediatric service. Not only does superficial infection of the skin constitute a potential danger to the patient, but the new mother is particularly disturbed both mentally and physically when she learns that her infant has an "infection" which in many instances prevents her seeing the baby for several days.

Sanford1 has recommended that the infant be given no bath or other skin treatment for the first nine days of life. However, the fact that pustular eruptions are too frequent occurrences during infancy raises a question as to the advisability of this plan. Chadwell,2 in

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