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Article
March 1951

ADVERSE MERCURIAL REACTIONS IN THE FORM OF ACRODYNIA AND RELATED CONDITIONS

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI
From the Children's Hospital Research Foundation and the Department of Pediatrics and the Kettering Laboratory of Applied Physiology, University of Cincinnati.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1951;81(3):335-373. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1951.02040030345004
Abstract

ACRODYNIA is a symptom complex which is easily recognized in the fully developed form. According to Bilderback,1 the outstanding symptoms are pink hands and feet, desquamation, scarlet cheeks and tip of nose, alopecia, salivation, loss of several or all of the teeth, occasional loss of nails or phalanges, excessive perspiration, evanescent rashes, marked hypotonia, itching, burning and severe pain of the extremities, increased pulse rate and blood pressure, photophobia, insomnia and apathy alternating with extreme irritability. If the manifestations of the disease are mild or are associated with complications, the diagnosis may be doubtful. None of the above symptoms is alone diagnostic for the disease, and opinions differ concerning the cardinal changes of acrodynia. Some authors consider the nervous manifestions of the disease essential for the diagnosis, while others emphasize cutaneous or cardiovascular symptoms. In spite of the diagnostic uncertainties the syndrome is well established as a disease entity.

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