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Article
April 1951

USE OF AN ANTIHISTAMINIC DRUG FOR TREATMENT OF THE COMMON COLD AT A SUMMER CAMP FOR BOYS

Author Affiliations

SAYRE, PA.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1951;81(4):530-533. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1951.02040030541006
Abstract

WHETHER the antihistaminic drugs are of value in the prevention and treatment of the common cold in its early stages is still a controversial matter. Because of the widespread use of these drugs in the home and the possibly dangerous implications of their indiscriminate use, any further information on their efficacy is of value. An unusual opportunity presented itself for a controlled clinical study of antihistamine efficacy the results of which are described in this paper

In recent reports on the use of the antihistaminic drugs for the common cold different conclusions have been reached, and different methods of study have been undertaken. Several of these reports1 concluded that the antihistaminic drugs did not seem to be more effective than the control medication. Of these three studies, one was performed on a small series in an army camp, the other two on large groups, the data being collected by

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