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Article
May 1951

PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL STUDY OF CHILDREN BORN DEAF FOLLOWING MATERNAL RUBELLA IN PREGNANCY

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1951;81(5):627-635. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1951.02040030640002
Abstract

DURING the period 1939 to 1941, a series of observations was made by Dr. N. McAlister Gregg, of Australia, which has proved to be a new landmark in the investigation of congenital defects in infants. These observations concerned an entirely new variety of congenital cataract of dense nuclear type occurring in babies and differing from any of the previously reported morphological types both in appearance and in developmental opacity. In 1941 Gregg's report1 of his study of 78 such cases among children of New South Wales revealed the singular fact that the mothers of these babies, with few exceptions, had suffered from an exanthematous disease during early pregnancy. This disease had been diagnosed as rubella. Gregg, himself, was at first inclined to doubt the accuracy of the diagnosis, since apparently such defects had only come to notice as late as 1939. However, in 1942 the exanthematous disease in question

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