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Article
August 1951

NASAL, NASOPHARYNGEAL, AND THROAT SUCTION APPARATUS FOR THE NEWBORN AND SMALL INFANT

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.
From the Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1951;82(2):169-170. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1951.02040040182008
Abstract

REMOVAL of excessive quantities of foreign material, such as mucus, blood, or regurgitated formula, from the upper respiratory passages of infants is not a new problem. In the hospital suitable suction apparatus for this purpose is usually available, but in the home or the office, when faced with emergencies, the pediatrician often has no quick, safe, and adequate source of suction.

Because it was recognized that in such difficult circumstances a conveniently portable and inexpensive suction apparatus might well be lifesaving, the bulb suction apparatus was developed. It is neither too bulky nor too expensive for ownership by the practitioner.

APPARATUS  The apparatus (Fig.)1 has been designed as simply as possible in order to aid the physician working alone and to facilitate cleaning and care of the equipment. It is composed of a round-tipped, multiple-opening catheter which is attached to the suction bulb by a glass adapter. The catheter

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