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Article
November 1951

USE OF DESOXYCORTICOSTERONE ACETATE IN DEHYDRATION AND MALNUTRITION IN INFANCY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Children's Memorial Hospital and the Otho S. A. Sprague Laboratories.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1951;82(5):548-554. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1951.02040040568003
Abstract

THE CASES to be reported cannot be considered proved cases of adrenal cortical hypoplasia or deficiency. The patients did, however, have many of the symptoms of adrenal cortical deficiency, and they did respond to desoxycorticosterone acetate and salt therapy usually after other forms of treatment had failed. Unfortunately, there was a lack of sufficient laboratory data, especially of serum potassium, sodium, and chloride levels and of electrocardiograms.

At present three clinical syndromes due to disturbances in adrenal cortical secretions are recognized, according to Deamer and Silver,1 namely, (1) hypofunction of the adrenal cortex causing disturbance of the salt-controlling and water-controlling hormone (Addison's disease), (2) hyperfunction of the adrenal cortex leading to masculinization and precocious maturation (excess androgen secretion), and (3) the combination of an excess of one hormone—androgen—and the simultaneous deficiency of the other—the salt and water hormone. Cushing's syndrome may be considered a fourth possibility. Here there is

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