[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.185.157. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 1952

ORIGIN OF THE LEFT CORONARY ARTERY FROM THE PULMONARY ARTERY

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; MADISON, WIS.
From the Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, and State of Wisconsin General Hospital.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1952;83(6):774-781. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1952.02040100072007
Abstract

THE LEFT coronary artery arising from the pulmonary artery represents a rare anomaly which until 1933 was not diagnosed clinically.1 Abrikosoff2 reported the first case in 1911. In 1946 Kaunitz3 found 27 cases in the literature and added 2 of his own. In 1949 Gasul and Loeffler4 collected 22 cases in the literature and reported 4 additional cases. Since then four more cases have been described.5

Patients with this anomaly usually do not survive the first year of life, although a few have lived to adulthood. In infancy a distinctive picture may be recognized. It is characterized by progressive dyspnea, apparent pain and symptoms of shock after feeding, and progressive cardiac enlargement and failure. Cyanosis, clubbing, cardiac murmurs, and thrills are absent. The electrocardiogram shows inversion of T waves, usually in all three limb leads, and low voltage. Roentgenograms and fluoroscopy reveal conspicuous cardiac enlargement,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×