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Article
December 1952

FACTORS DETERMINING EFFECT OF INSULIN ON METABOLISM OF GLUCOSE IN ASCORBIC ACID DEFICIENCY AND SCURVY IN THE MONKEY

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS; IOWA CITY
From the Department of Pediatrics of the Colleges of Medical Sciences of the University of Minnesota and State University of Iowa.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1952;84(6):677-691. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1952.02050060015001
Abstract

AS PART of an investigation of the adrenocortical function in scurvy, an attempt was made to use the effect of insulin on the level of glucose in the blood as one test of adrenocortical function. Selection of this test was based on the experience of Fraser and associates,1 who demonstrated its usefulness in the evaluation of the adrenocortical function in humans. In adrenal insufficiency, insulin injected intravenously produces sustained hypoglycemia. When insulin was administered intravenously to scorbutic monkeys, the level of glucose in the blood was never more than slightly depressed and frequently actually rose. This response indicated an increase in the activity of the adrenal cortex, rather than a decrease. This is contrary to what might have been expected, considering the supposed role of ascorbic acid in adrenocortical function and its virtual absence from the adrenal gland in scurvy.

A review of the literature concerning the effect of

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