[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 1952

TRUNCUS ARTERIOSUS ASSOCIATED WITH A SINGLE VENTRICLE

Author Affiliations

SALT LAKE CITY; U.S.N.R.
From the Department of Pediatrics, Gallinger Municipal Hospital and George Washington University School of Medicine.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1952;84(6):706-717. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1952.02050060044003
Abstract

WITH THE advancement of cardiac surgery accurate diagnosis of congenital heart and vascular defects, by necessity, has had to keep pace. Not only is it important to determine which patients will be benefited by surgery, but those patients who will not be benefited must be recognized as well. Cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography have added much to the diagnostic armamentarium, but these techniques are difficult or impossible to use with small infants. The cyanotic infant still constitutes a difficult diagnostic problem, and many do not live to be over one month of age.

In the hope of facilitating a more complete understanding of the congenital heart disease which manifests itself in the first few months of life, we should like to report three unusual cases and a review of the literature of cases of persistent truncus arteriosus communis associated with a single ventricle.

Wilson,1 in 1798, reported one of the

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×