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Article
October 1953

ROLE OF THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER AND SPECIALIST IN CARE OF PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

PITTSBURGH
Professor of Maternal and Child Health, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1953;86(4):447-455. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1953.02050080459007
Abstract

NOT EVERY person with a physical disability is handicapped by it. The definition of the term "physically handicapped child" as used in this paper is a child who, because of a physical disability, cannot compete on equal terms with other children. The mere existence of a physical deviation does not make it a disability. A child with a hammertoe or with mild weakness of a thumb subsequent to polio need not be considered handicapped.

Furthermore, physical handicaps are not limited to those which affect use of the arms or legs. A child who is deaf is just as handicapped as a child who carries a crutch. Disabilities such as heart disease or deafness are more difficult to bear because they are not obvious externally and do not receive the same consideration and attention from others.

There are still other kinds of physical handicaps with equal or greater impact on the

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