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Article
January 1954

FOOD POISONING IN INFANTS CAUSED BY EGG-YOLK POWDER

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Bureaus of Preventable Diseases, Food and Drugs, and Laboratories, New York City Department of Health.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1954;87(1):1-6. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1954.02050090001001
Abstract

DURING the last quarter of 1952, there occurred in a number of cities throughout the United States1 cases of food poisoning in infants one year of age and under. The incriminated food was a canned egg-yolk-powder preparation, and the offending organism, Salmonella montevideo. Thirteen babies became ill with fever and acute diarrhea in New York City. The epidemiological and clinical features of these cases form the basis of this report.

On Nov. 20, 1952, the U. S. Food and Drug Administration was informed of the occurrence of salmonellosis in an infant in Washington, D. C., who had received egg yolk as part of his diet. Salmonella montevideo was recovered from the child's stool and from the egg-yolk powder. Additional cases cropped up in other cities.1 On Nov. 28, this information was given to the office of the Assistant Commissioner for Environmental Sanitation of the department.* On Dec. 2,

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