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Article
December 1954

NEARLY FATAL CASE OF SCHOENLEIN-HENOCH SYNDROME FOLLOWING INSECT BITE

Author Affiliations

ELKINS, W. Va.
From the Departments of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine, The Golden Clinic, Memorial General Hospital.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1954;88(6):772-774. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1954.02050100774011
Abstract

SCHOENLEIN-HENOCH syndrome, or anaphylactoid or allergic purpura, is a symptom complex which consists of a combination of two or more of the following symptoms: purpura, joint pain and/or swelling, intestinal colic, and intestinal bleeding. Renal bleeding may occur. The platelet count is normal or only slightly decreased. A case of this syndrome with all the above-mentioned findings is presented because of its unusual severity and because of its dramatic response to cortisone and its probable origin in an insect bite.

REPORT OF CASE  A white 4-year-old girl was admitted to the Golden Clinic on June 26, 1953. History was obtained from the parents. The chief complaints were diarrhea and swelling of the ankles. The present illness began seven days previously, when the child was stung on the right ankle by an insect, believed by the parents to be a deer fly or a wasp. Local swelling began in a matter

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