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Article
May 1956

INVOLVEMENT OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM IN INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS IN CHILDHOOD

Author Affiliations

New Haven, Conn.
Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1956;91(5):490-494. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1956.02060020492012
Abstract

INFECTIOUS mononucleosis with manifestations involving the central nervous system is apparently uncommon in childhood. Although over 100 cases with neurologic signs have been reported in all age groups, only 11 of these were in children. Specifically, convulsions have occurred in a total of 13 cases, but in only 4 were the patients less than 16 years old. The purpose of this paper is to report a child with infectious mononucleosis whose presenting sign was a grand mal seizure and to review some of the findings gathered from the literature.

REPORT OF CASE  A 9-year-old white boy was admitted to the pediatric service of the Grace-New Haven Community Hospital on Nov. 8, 1954, for evaluation of a grand mal seizure. The youngest of 10 normal children, he had always been in good health, somehow escaping the usual contagious childhood diseases. Two weeks prior to admission, he had had a mild upper

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