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Article
April 1961

Maturation of the Pulmonary Vascular BedA Physiologic and Anatomic Correlation in Infants and Children

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS
Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School (14).; From the Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Hospitals, and the Department of Surgery, Veterans Administration Hospital.; Postdoctoral Research Fellow, National Heart Institute, United States Public Health Service, and Research Fellow, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota (Dr. Lucas); Research Fellow, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota (Dr. St. Geme); Professor, Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, and Chief of Surgery, Veterans Administration Hospital, Minneapolis (Dr. Ferguson); Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota (Dr. Anderson), and Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota (Dr. Adams).

Am J Dis Child. 1961;101(4):467-475. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1961.04020050057010
Abstract

Foreword  From anatomical observations, high pulmonary vascular resistance has been predicted for the normal infant. Physiologic data obtained in studies on 44 normal infants and children are used to test this hypothesis. The correlation noted between total pulmonary resistance and pulmonary arteriolar anatomy in the normal child provides a foundation for the better understanding of changes in pulmonary physiology associated with congenital heart disease.In 1927, Moschcowitz1 suggested that pulmonary vascular changes may be a factor in the natural history of congenital heart disease. In more recent years, Edwards,2 Dammann and Ferencz,3 and Heath and Best4 have pointed out a relationship between pulmonary vascular pathology and the intracardiac hemodynamics of congenital heart malformations. The influence of pulmonary vascular changes on the natural history of ventricular septal defects and the effect of these changes on the response of the patient to surgical correction of this defect have been

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