March 1962

Opening Remarks

Author Affiliations

Public Health Service U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare

Am J Dis Child. 1962;103(3):217-218. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1962.02080020229003

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I am grateful for the opportunity to be here with you this morning. I thank all of you for coming here, and I know that under the direction of Dr. Kempe you will have a successful and rewarding meeting.

It is particularly gratifying to know that the research findings to be presented during these 3 days by scientists from 20 countries represent a unified effort to solve an age-old, universal problem-that of measles.

The possibility of successful inoculation against measles was foreseen more than 200 years ago. In a book entitled Tentamen de Inoculanda Peste, published in London in 1755, the author, a Hungarian physician, had this to say about the disease which, as he puts it, "causes trouble to each mortal only once."

"Concerning measles, there is no doubt at all that the experiment (inoculation) would be successful. But while the disease lasts only a very short time, no

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