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Article
March 1962

Importance of Measles to India

Author Affiliations

NEW DELHI, INDIA
Pran N. Taneja, M.D., Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 16, India.; Professor of Pediatrics (Dr. Taneja); Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Dr. Ghai); Research Fellow (Dr. Bhakoo).; From the Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences.

Am J Dis Child. 1962;103(3):226-229. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1962.02080020238006
Abstract

A fast developing country like India faces several major problems, those of rapid industrialization, improvement of standards of living of a mass of poorly educated humanity, eradication of malnutrition, and elimination of communicable diseases which continue to take a heavy toll of life every year.

The census in India for 1961 shows a total population of 438 million. A large majority of this—80%, a preponderantly agricultural community—live in villages with poor housing and environmental sanitation. Population at Risk Figure 1 shows the distribution in the younger age groups, those believed to be

INDIA ESTIMATED POPULATION OF CHILDREN (MID 1959) "AT RISK TO MEASLES." FIGURES IN MILLIONS. ANDAMAN.01 NICOBAR.02 HIGH RISK CHILDREN 0-5 YEARS 67.71 VULNERABLE 11.8 CHILDREN 0-10 YEARS 152.1

Figure 1 more susceptible to measles (see below). Thus, 158 million children under 10 years of age constitute a vulnerable population, only a little less than the total population of

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