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Article
March 1962

Attenuated Measles Vaccine in Nigerian Children

Author Affiliations

BOSTON; ILESHA, NIGERIA; NEW YORK
Samuel L. Katz, M.D., The Children's Hospital Medical Center, Boston.; From the Research Division of Infectious Diseases, The Children's Hospital Medical Center and the Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School; the Wesley Guild Hospital, Ilesha, West Nigeria; and the Department of Pediatrics, New York University School of Medicine.; Professor and Chairman, Department of Pediatrics, New York University School of Medicine (Dr. Krugman); Lecturer, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria (Dr. Morley); Associate in Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School and Research Associate, Research Division of Infectious Diseases, The Children's Hospital Medical Center, Boston (Dr. Katz).

Am J Dis Child. 1962;103(3):402-405. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1962.02080020414047
Abstract

Introduction  That measles and its complications are of major importance as causes of morbidity and mortality in Nigeria has been emphasized by recent studies.1 Those factors which seem to underlie the unusual severity of the disease are the occurrence of annual epidemics with a resultant lowering of the mean age incidence to 15 months, the extremely high rate of pyogenic complications involving the skin and respiratory tract, and the frequency of stomatitis and diarrhea inducing dehydration. In Nigeria, measles is the acute infection most likely to precipitate acute kwashiorkor. Over the last 5 years an investigation into the morbidity and mortality among children under the age of 5 years has been conducted at the Wesley Guild Hospital in Ilesha, Western Nigeria. Of the acute infective fevers, measles was found to be outstanding as a cause of death. Because of this experience, a trial of attenuated measles-virus vaccine seemed highly

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