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Article
March 1962

Viral Content and Stability of Live Measles Vaccines

Author Affiliations

PEARL RIVER, N.Y.
Floyd S. Markham, Ph.D., Viral and Rickettsial Research Section, Lederle Laboratories, American Cyanamid Co., Pearl River, N.Y.; From the Viral and Rickettsial Research Section, Lederle Laboratories, American Cyanamid Co., Pearl River, N.Y.

Am J Dis Child. 1962;103(3):437-440. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1962.02080020449059
Abstract

Because measles virus rapidly loses viability in aqueous media at ordinary temperatures, particular attention must be given to the viral content and the stability of any live virus measles vaccine. In order to assure its successful use in the clinic and the physician's office, the vaccine must have stability characteristics that are consistent with the vicissitudes of distribution through the normal channels of transportation and handling in both domestic and international commerce.

In establishing reasonable and practical criteria for live virus measles vaccines, the 3 important considerations are (1) the minimum amount of virus required to induce an immunizing infection with regularity; (2) the influence of increased dosage on the clinical responses of susceptible subjects, and (3) the testing standards necessary to assure that these field requirements are met.

The data assembled here are based on the use of the Edmonston strain of measles virus, propagated in cultures of whole

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