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Article
April 1964

Cardiac Complications of Marfan's Syndrome In a ChildReport of a Case With Rapidly Progressive Course Terminating With Rupture of a Dissecting Aneurysm

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
Sidney Friedman, MD, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 18th and Bainbridge Streets, Philadelphia, Pa ; From the Division of Cardiology and the Department of Pathologic Anatomy of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

Am J Dis Child. 1964;107(4):404-409. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1964.02080060406013
Abstract

It is the purpose of this report to describe the clinical and pathologic findings in a 4-year-old child who demonstrated the complete spectrum of cardiac pathology associated with Marfan's syndrome during a nine-month period prior to her death. The rapidly progressive alterations in the cardiovascular system were accompanied by relatively mild musculoskeletal manifestations and none of the characteristic ocular changes.

The diagnosis of Marfan's syndrome was initially suspected at the age of 4 years after the discovery of a cardiac murmur indicating the presence of aortic insufficiency. At this time plain roentgenograms of the chest revealed cardiac enlargement with dilatation of the ascending aorta. At 4 years and 8 months, angiocardiography demonstrated aneurysmal dilatation of the sinuses of Valsalva and the first portion of the aorta as well as a dissecting aneurysm involving the anterior surface of the ascending aorta. Death occurred abruptly one month later as a result of

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