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Article
October 1964

Corticosterone Half-Life in Children

Author Affiliations

LITTLE ROCK, ARK; SALT LAKE CITY; KALAMAZOO, MICH; SALT LAKE CITY; PHOENIX, ARIZ; MEMPHIS; SEATTLE
Vincent C. Kelley, MD, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash 98105.; From the departments of Pediatrics, University of Utah, the University of Arkansas, and the University of Washington.

Am J Dis Child. 1964;108(4):366-371. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1964.02090010368006
Abstract

Corticosterone (4-pregnene-11 β, 21 diol-3,20-dione; compound B) is a major product of adrenal steroidogenesis in most animal species.1 In man, it is present in peripheral blood2-12 and in adrenal vein effluent3,13-15 in quantities second only to cortisol. The concentrations of corticosterone present in the circulation, although small compared with those of cortisol, are not insignificant.

Numerous studies have been reported concerning the rates of metabolism of cortisol as reflected by the plasma half-life of this steroid in normal individuals and in patients with various disease states.16-24 Yet, comparatively few data are available regarding the rates of metabolism of corticosterone. The purpose of this communication is to report the results of corticosterone half-life studies performed in our laboratories on normal children and children with a variety of diseases.

Materials and Methods  The 96 children used in this study were either inpatients or outpatients at the Salt Lake

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