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Article
September 1965

WHAT SHOULD THE CHILD WITH LEUKEMIA BE TOLD?

Author Affiliations

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Bethesda, Md; MD Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute Houston

Am J Dis Child. 1965;110(3):335. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1965.02090030349022

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Abstract

To the Editor: In their editorial in this issue of the Journal entitled "What Should the Child With Leukemia be Told?" Mr. Agranoff and Dr. Mauer have raised certain issues which need to be examined critically. They are concerned about the applicability of the information gained and the techniques developed on a "leukemia ward" to deal with the emotional problems of the fatally ill child to the situation pertaining to those children who are treated in less specialized settings. They feel that, while the approach described by Vernick and Karon is appropriate to the former situation where almost all the children have the same disease, it may not be applicable to the latter. In their opinion, the leukemic child on a general medical ward "has no particular reason to relate himself to the hospital course of any other children," and they quote the frequently cited report of Richmond and Waisman

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