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Article
December 1966

PENICILLIN AND THE STREPTOCOCCUS

Author Affiliations

Pediatric Resident Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital 3395 Scranton Rd Cleveland 44109

Am J Dis Child. 1966;112(6):608-609. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1966.02090150152025

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Abstract

To the Editor: Recognizing the fact that medical progress is in part measured by new therapies I am nevertheless disturbed by the article "Beta Hemolytic Streptococcal Illness" (Amer J Dis Child112: 21-27, 1966). Evaluating the effectiveness of ampicillin (Penbritin, Polycillin, Omnipen) and lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate (Lincocin) in the treatment of streptococcal disease in children implies, by matter of association with penicillin G, their acceptibility as modes of therapy in streptococcal disease. The point should be made that despite the fact these drugs work, they are certainly not acceptable substitutes for penicillin in cases of pure streptococcal illness. It should be stressed that they have very definite properties and advantages which should suggest their use at specified times only. The problem of emergence of drug resistant organisms is a most serious one. Fortunately, β-hemolytic streptococci have remained sensitive to penicillin despite its continued widespread use.

Let's not exhaust our armamentarium.

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