August 1967


Author Affiliations

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Am J Dis Child. 1967;114(2):213-214. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1967.02090230142022

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To the Editor.—In reply to the thoughtful letter of Dr. Joseph Baldwin concerning our interpretation of Gesell's work, the following comments are submitted.

The statements in the paper of the Journal are in no way meant to downgrade the enormous contributions which Gesell made to the field of measurement. Without question, he established Child Development as a major part of the Medical Sciences, and stimulated enormous thought in Pediatrics and Psychology. He was a man far ahead of his time. Nevertheless, his approaches differ from those of many elements of modern Psychology, yet no one need apologize for these differences. Modern psychologic approach has been shifting in emphasis from the constitutional to the environmental, and it is worth noting that these effects have not yet been completely substantiated, but represent a fertile field for future investigation.

Gesell's studies describe the characteristics of behavior at each successive age, and through

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