August 1967


Author Affiliations

280 W MacArthur Blvd Oakland, Calif 94611

Am J Dis Child. 1967;114(2):214. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1967.02090230144023

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To the Editor.—In the article, "Growth Disturbance in Hereditary Hypophosphatemia" (Amer J Dis Child112:290, [Oct] 1966), Dr. Harrison and his colleagues do not support their conclusions with data. It is stated that infants with hereditary hypophosphatemia have normal serum phosphate concentrations during the first months of life; yet the levels in the three illustrative cases are not compared with age-corrected normal values from the authors' laboratory—a very risky business, in view of the paucity of published serum phosphate values in normal infants, and the demonstration by Greenberg et al (J Clin Endocr20:364, 1960) of a marked change in serum phosphate levels with age in normal, older infants, children, and adults.

A point is also made that the children treated by Dr. Harrison and his coauthors became abnormally-short adults in spite of vitamin D therapy; but we are not told whether vitamin D in large doses was

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