November 1968

The Role of Voluntary and Governmental Groups of Physicians

Author Affiliations

Bronx, NY
From the Division of Pediatrics, Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center, Morrisania City Hospital, and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.

Am J Dis Child. 1968;116(5):472-478. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1968.02100020476004

IN THIS presentation I shall assume that social and scientific progress have so altered the nature of medical science as to mandate changes in the way medical care is delivered. It is my belief that a wider application of group practice would ease but not eliminate what Surgeon General Stewart1-3 has called "the present crisis of unfulfilled health needs in the United States." I am also assuming without further elaboration that health and society are interrelated and interdependent4-6 and that both social and medical factors influence individual and collective health. Therefore, changes in medical care delivery may not, in themselves, necessarily improve the national health. I propose to discuss group practice, to indicate its potential advantages for the patient, the physician and society, and to describe three medical groups operated by Montefiore Hospital, commenting briefly upon their similarities and differences and upon their possible role in house staff

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