August 1971

Evaluation of Attenuated Rubella Virus Vaccine in Families

Author Affiliations

New Orleans; Keesler Air Force Base, Miss
From the Department of Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans (Dr. Mogabgab) and the Department of Pediatrics, Keesler Medical Center, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss (Lt Col Stowe).

Am J Dis Child. 1971;122(2):122-128. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1971.02110020056005

Observations were maintained for a year on 642 children and 238 mothers from families of military personnel living in an open community on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Live attenuated rubella virus vaccine prepared with the HPV-77 strain in duck embryo cell cultures was administered to 197 and withheld from 160 children without hemagglutination-inhibition antibody. Antibody responses occurred in all vaccinees, but 13 required more than one injection. Levels were relatively stable during the study period but some increased, probably due to reinfection with natural virus. Most mothers were immune and evidence of transmission of vaccine virus was not obtained. Rubella occurred but was not observed in vaccinees. Immunity could not be determined by serum antibody titer at time of rash. In newborns, antibody rapidly declined for six months and was absent by nine months.