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Article
August 1973

Tendency Toward Greater Stature in American Black Children

Author Affiliations

Ann Arbor, Mich; Atlanta
From the Center for Human Growth and Development and the School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Dr. Garn and Mrs. Clark); and the Nutrition Section, Center for Disease Control, Atlanta (Dr. Trowbridge).

Am J Dis Child. 1973;126(2):164-166. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1973.02110190144006
Abstract

As shown in more than 10,000 low-in-come boys and girls, children largely of West African ancestry (American Negroes or blacks) tended to have greater statures during the first 12 years of life, particularly children matched for per-capita income and in whom black-white differences in stature averaged in excess of 2.0 cm.

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