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Article
August 1976

Neurologic Infections in Children

Author Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine Center for Health Sciences Los Angeles, CA 90024

 

Major Problems in Clinical Pediatrics, vol 12, by William E. Bell and William F. McCormick, 456 pp, 132 illus, $22.00, WB Saunders Co, 1975.

Am J Dis Child. 1976;130(8):904-905. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1976.02120090114030

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Abstract

This book contains an extensive bibliography, is well illustrated, and it is apparent that the authors put much effort into it. However, I must say at the outset that it contains many minor and several major errors. In addition to clear-cut errors, there are also numerous instances of over- or under-emphasis of available data, which could lead the unwary reader to diagnostic and therapeutic mistakes in the clinical situation.

Chapter 1 is entitled "Bacterial Meningitis: General Concepts and Management." In this chapter, antibiotic data are often incomplete, wrong, and unrelated. For example, the dose of ampicillin sodium for the premature infant (50 mg/kg/day) is insufficient. In Table 1-5, the ampicillin dosage interval is stated as four to six hours. It is important to emphasize that all reliable published studies on the use of ampicillin in meningitis employed four-hour intervals. The authors state, "In order to establish adequate blood levels rapidly

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