October 1976

Auditory Assessment of the Difficult-to-Test

Author Affiliations

Rochester, NY


edited by Robert T. Fulton, Lyle L. Lloyd, and Robert Hoyt, 297 pp, 68 illus, $15.75, Williams & Wilkins Co, 1975.

Am J Dis Child. 1976;130(10):1158-1159. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1976.02120110120022

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Audiology's body of knowledge has grown with impressive rapidity since its inception as a modern science in the 1940s. Drawing much of its early strength from psychology, speech pathology, and otolaryngology, audiology has become the discipline that serves as a clearinghouse for problems related to the breakdown of auditory function. By the 1960s, audiologists were applying sophisticated technology, diagnostic acumen, and rehabilitative tact to a large segment of the hearing-impaired population. In 1965, perhaps the first major conference on the audiologic assessment of the mentally retarded was staged. The forum was the Bureau of Child Research, University of Kansas, and the Parsons (Kansas) State Hospital and Training Center, with support from the National Institute of Mental Health. Proceedings of this conference were published and became the first organized attempt to investigate the audiologic evaluation of the retarded. Subsequently, in 1969, a second conference produced the text, Audiometry for the

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