[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.147.196.37. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 1978

Circumcision

Author Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics New England Medical Center Hospital 20 Ash St Boston, MA 02111

Am J Dis Child. 1978;132(12):1168-1169. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1978.02120370016003

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Opponents routine circumcision of the male infant will greet with pleasure the appearance of the article by Annunziato and Goldblum (p 1187) and the one by Sussman et al (p 1189) on unusual complications of the operation. Those who favor routine circumcision will be quick to point out that Fournier's syndrome and the scalded skin syndrome are very rare complications that should not deter parents from requesting circumcision for the newborn boy.

Circumcision of the newborn continues for the following reasons: it may be routine because of religious beliefs, and parents and physicians have for years accepted the procedure on the basis of arguments that the circumcised male is at less risk of having cancer of the penis develop, and that a malignant neoplasm in the genital tract of women married to circumcised men is less frequent than in women married to uncircumcised men. It is an incontestable fact at

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×