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Article
December 1979

Splenic Torsion in a Child

Author Affiliations

Pediatric Surgery Section Department of Surgery Pahlavi University School of Medicine Shiraz, Iran

Am J Dis Child. 1979;133(12):1282. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1979.02130120074016
Abstract

Torsion of the spleen with subsequent splenic infarction is a rare condition. We have found only six cases in the medical literature. Of 1,413 splenectomies performed on patients under 16 years of age, only four were performed for management of torsion of the spleen.1 Frederik et al2 reported a case of splenic torsion in a 7-year-old child, and Shende et al3 reported one in a 4-year-old child.

Report of a Case.—A 12-year-old girl was hospitalized in July 1977 with a one-month history of pain and a mass in the right lower quadrant. The pain was acute at onset, but subsequently became constant and mild and was associated with vomiting and fever. The abdomen was slightly distended, with a few prominent bowel loops. The child was febrile to 38°C. There was an ill-defined, firm, tender lump in the hypogastrium extending into the pelvis and the right lower

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