May 1980

Triplo-X and Down Syndrome-Reply

Author Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics State University of New York Upstate Medical Center Syracuse, NY 13210

Am J Dis Child. 1980;134(5):527. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1980.02130170077031

In Reply.—Major Yeatman adds another clinical example of polysomy-X masquerading as Down's syndrome. The reference to the publication of Robinson et al is welcome, since it had not been published when I did my review. I take exception to Major Yeatman's facetious last sentence concerning the eponym derived from Dr Down's surname. His statement that "... Down syndrome is the nomenclature presently accepted by geneticists..." is inaccurate. The situation is a very mixed one, as indicated by the fact that in journals such as Clinical Genetics and the Journal of Medical Genetics one sees "Down's syndrome" used, as well as in a genetics textbook such as Levitan and Montagu's Textbook of Human Genetics. The Lancet is ambivalent: "Down syndrome"1 appears to be favored now, but it still uses "Burkitt's lymphoma"!2 Eponyms with multiple surnames have never lent themselves to the use of the possessive, such as Prader-Willi syndrome