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Article
January 1982

Nonconvulsive Epileptiform Activity Appearing as Ataxia

Author Affiliations

From the Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics and Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY. Dr Bennett is now with the Section of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics and Neurology, Brookdale Hospital Medical Center, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn. Dr Selman is now with the Section of Pediatric Neurology, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY. Dr Rose is now with the Section of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Neurology, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn.

Am J Dis Child. 1982;136(1):30-32. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1982.03970370032007
Abstract

• Ataxia may be the result of otherwise silent epileptiform activity. We studied three patients, between 3 and 5 years of age, whose initial complaint was unsteadiness of gait. Each one of the patients had an epileptiform EEG with bursts of slow spike and wave activity. Each had normal results of diagnostic studies for other causes of ataxia. Specifically, none had anticonvulsant drug levels in the toxic range. Modification of the anticonvulsant regimen resulted in dramatic clinical and EEG improvement. Nonconvulsive epileptiform activity has been called pseudoataxia in the scant literature on this subject. This process should be considered in the evaluation of ataxia in children.

(Am J Dis Child 1982;136:30-32)

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