April 1982

Vaccination of Pediatric Nurses With Live Attenuated Cytomegalovirus

Author Affiliations

From the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

Am J Dis Child. 1982;136(4):294-296. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1982.03970400012003

• Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections contribute considerably to morbidity and mortality among infants in the United States. In a preliminary study aimed at protecting fetuses from congenital disease we evaluated Towne 125—strain CMV vaccine in ten female pediatric nurses of childbearing age. The women were seen 2, 4, 8, 12, 26, 39, and 52 weeks after vaccination; specimens were obtained for routine laboratory testing, virus isolation, cell-mediated immunity testing, and serologic examination (complement fixation, anticomplement immunofluorescence [ACIF], and neutralization). Local but not systemic reactions were observed in all subjects. Serologic responses appeared at two to four weeks and peaked at four to eight weeks. Mean titers were highest in the ACIF test. A cell-mediated immune response, as assayed by lymphocyte proliferation, was observed in all women, and in most there was a biphasic pattern. Towne 125—strain CMV vaccine seems to be safe and immunogenic in women of childbearing age.

(Am J Dis Child 1982;136:294-296)