April 1983

Rib Cage Deformity in Neonatal Hyperparathyroidism

Author Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics
Department of Radiology Hôpital Jean Verdier 93140 Bondy, France

Am J Dis Child. 1983;137(4):408. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1983.02140300086028

Sir.—We were very interested in the article, "Neonatal Primary Hyperparathyroidism in Familial Hypocalciuric Hypercalcemia," by Matsuo et al (Journal 1982;136:728-731), particularly by the initial finding of respiratory distress contributed by rib cage deformity. We report a case of neonatal hyperparathyroidism with rib cage deformity similar to "asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia."

Report of a Case.—We observed a female neonate born at term, weighing 2,900 g. She was transferred to our hospital at the age of 16 hours because of respiratory distress. Examination showed an extremely narrow chest that resembled asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia. A chest roentgenogram showed thin, short, and demineralized ribs. A roentgenogram of the skeleton confirmed generalized demineralization. Laboratory data included a serum calcium concentration of 11.2 mg/dL, a serum phosphate level of 5.5 mg/dL, and serum alkaline phosphatase level of 450IU. Urinary excretion of calcium, phosphate, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate were 5 mg/day, 155 mg/day, and 21 nmole/mg