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Article
September 1988

Chlamydia trachomatis Fitz-Hugh-Curtis Syndrome Without Salpingitis in Female Adolescents

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pediatrics and the Division of Adolescent Medicine, Stanford (Calif) University School of Medicine and the Children's Hospital at Stanford (Drs Katzman and Litt); the Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco (Dr Friedman); and the Division of Adolescent Medicine, Children's Hospital Oakland (Calif) (Dr McDonald). Dr Katzman is a Robert Wood Johnson General Pediatric Academic Development Fellow.

Am J Dis Child. 1988;142(9):996-998. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1988.02150090094033
Abstract

• We encountered seven female adolescents with the Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome and no signs or symptoms of salpingitis. Six of the patients had cervical cultures positive for Chlamydia trachomatis. The Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis of right-sided abdominal pain in the sexually active female adolescent to avoid unnecessary diagnostic procedures and to reduce the prevalence of chlamydial infection and its complications.

(AJDC 1988;142:996-998)

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