June 1991

Tracking of Elevated Blood Pressure Values in Adolescent Athletes at 1-Year Follow-up

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Family Practice, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento.

Am J Dis Child. 1991;145(6):665-667. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1991.02160060083026

• Resting blood pressures were measured in 467 adolescents during preparticipation physical examinations for high school sports. Fifty-seven of the athletes (12.2%) had significantly elevated blood pressures. Forty-three (79.6%) of 54 subjects demonstrated significantly and persistently elevated blood pressures at 1-year follow-up. A family history of hypertension was positively associated with elevated blood pressures in 46 (80.7%) of 57 subjects compared with controls (23/410 [5.6%]). Consistent with previous studies, subjects with elevated blood pressures had a greater body weight (94.5 ±25.7 kg) compared with normotensive subjects (75.2 ±14.0 kg). Subjects with elevated blood pressures engaged in heavy resistance weight training (three times a week or more) more often (41/57 [71.9%]) than normotensive subjects (65/410 [15.8%]). These data support the idea that blood pressures measured during routine preparticipation physical examinations for high school sports are a useful tool in screening for elevated blood pressure in adolescents.

(AJDC. 1991;145:665-667)