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Article
April 1993

Compliance With Childhood Cholesterol Screening Among Members of a Prepaid Health Plan

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pediatrics (Drs Bachman and Schoen), the Division of Genetics (Dr Bachman and Mss Stembridge and Imagire), and the Regional Perinatal Screening Program (Drs Bachman and Schoen and Ms Jurecki), Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, Oakland, Calif. Ms Imagire is now with the School of Public Health Genetics Counseling Program, University of California, Berkeley.

Am J Dis Child. 1993;147(4):382-385. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1993.02160280032013
Abstract

• Objective.  —To assess compliance with cholesterol screening and intervention by children who were members of a prepaid health plan in which there was no financial barrier to intervention.

Research Design.  —Children with family histories of hypercholesterolemia, coronary heart disease, and stroke were advised to have a random cholesterol test. Those with total cholesterol levels of 4.80 mmol/L (185 mg/dL) or higher were asked to return for a fasting blood test; of this group, compliant subjects with low-density lipoprotein values of 3.25 mmol/L (125 mg/dL) or higher were offered a nutrition program.

Setting.  —Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Oakland, Calif.

Subjects and Participants.  —The parents of 1160 children aged 2 to 18 years who had routine pediatric appointments at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center were asked to complete screening forms on family history.

Selection Procedures.  —Children with family histories of hypercholesterolemia, coronary heart disease, and stroke were advised to have a random cholesterol test. Subjects with total cholesterol levels of 4.80 mmol/L or higher were asked to return for a fasting test, and subjects with low-density lipoprotein levels of 3.25 mmol/L or higher were offered a nutrition program.

Interventions.  —Telephone call, letter, low-cholesterol diet, and nutrition program.

Main Outcome Measures.  —Of the 1160 subjects contacted, 529 (46%) had positive family histories. Of these subjects, random blood cholesterol levels were determined for 369 (70%); 160 (30%) did not comply. Ninety-three subjects had total cholesterol levels of 4.80 mmol/L or higher; of these, 35 (38%) did not comply with follow-up testing. Of the 58 compliant subjects, 25 (43%) had low-density lipoprotein values of 3.25 mmol/L or higher and were offered either a 3-week or a 6-week nutrition program. Only nine subjects (36%) enrolled; 16 (64%) did not comply.

Conclusions.  —Parents do not comply well with a childhood cholesterol screening program that involves two blood tests and moderately intensive educational intervention. Compliance is an important component of cholesterol screening and intervention.(AJDC. 1993;147:382-385)

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