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Article
May 1993

The Value of Urinary Growth Hormone Determination for Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency and Compliance With Growth Hormone Therapy

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore.

Am J Dis Child. 1993;147(5):553-557. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1993.02160290059026
Abstract

• Objective.  —To compare the 24-hour integrated concentrations of plasma growth hormone with growth hormone levels in a simultaneously collected sample of urine.

Setting.  —Pediatric endocrine diagnostic unit.

Patients.  —Forty-six children (41 male and five female) aged 6 to 19 years underwent measurement of integrated concentrations of growth hormone and simultaneous urine collection.

Measurements and Results.  —Integrated concentration of plasma growth hormone was correlated with urinary growth hormone levels from both the 24-hour (r=.67; P<.0001) and 12-hour overnight (r=.52; P<.001) measurements. Peak growth hormone response to paired stimulation was not correlated with either the 24-hour (r=.26; P<.23; n=28) or 12-hour (r=.16; P<.48; n=28) urinary growth hormone levels. The mean 24- and 12-hour urinary growth hormone levels for the patients with normal integrated concentrations of growth hormone were significantly higher than those in patient groups having subnormal integrated concentrations of growth hormone (P<.05). However, there was considerable overlap in the 12- and 24-hour urinary growth hormone levels between the patients with normal and those with subnormal integrated concentrations of growth hormone. Only one patient who had subnormal integrated concentrations of growth hormone had a 24-hour urinary growth hormone level higher than 9 ng, and none had a 12-hour urinary growth hormone level higher than 7 ng. The mean 12- and 24-hour urinary growth hormone levels were significantly higher in patients who received growth hormone injection than in those with normal spontaneous integrated concentrations of growth hormone and had no overlap with patients who had subnormal integrated concentrations of growth hormone.

Conclusions.  —(1) Urinary and integrated concentrations of plasma growth hormone are correlated; (2) patient diagnoses based on integrated plasma growth hormone levels exhibit a high degree of overlap of urinary growth hormone; and (3) urinary growth hormone levels can serve to monitor compliance with growth hormone therapy.(AJDC. 1993;147:553-557)

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