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Article
November 1995

Pediatric Telephone Medicine: Principles, Triage, and Advice

Author Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics University of South Florida 1 Davis Blvd Tampa, FL 33606

 

2nd ed, by Jeffrey L. Brown, 304 pp, $29.95, ISBN 0-397-51379-8, Philadelphia, Pa, JB Lippincott, 1994.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1995;149(11):1293. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1995.02170240111033

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Abstract

Brown did an excellent job with this telephone triage book. It is a must-read for residents and others not experienced in telephone medicine. It is also a nice review for those of us more seasoned in the use of Alexander Graham Bell's never-a-quiet-moment invention. The book is divided into seven sections: "General Principles," "Common Symptoms," "Emergencies and Traumas," "Minor Infections," "Infectious Diseases," "Parenting Concerns," and "Infant Care." Each problem is further divided into a series consisting of screening questions, when to examine, a treatment plan, criteria for callback, and a short discussion of each complaint. Throughout are helpful clinical tips from experienced practitioners, highlighted in blue, that are not usually found in most texts.

The practical information in the "General Principles" section was especially good. It included various topics such as record keeping and liability issues, improving communication skills, educating parents, and even dealing with irate parents. Common complaints being

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