April 1997

Keeping Children and Families in the Center of Our ConcernAmbulatory Pediatric Association Presidential Address

Author Affiliations

From the Division of General Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1997;151(4):337-340. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1997.02170410011001

As ACADEMIC PEDIATRICIANS, we are easily caught up in the peripheral details of life. Keeping up with the financial demands, the umpteenth credentialing for managed care, the particular needs of our own institutions.

Editor's Note: It's once again a pleasure to share with our readers the wisdom of an Ambulatory Pediatric Association president by publishing the annual address. Read and smile. Catherine D. DeAngelis, MD

For now, let us put those things aside. Let us challenge ourselves with finding the way to keep children and families in the center of our concern. To do this, we need to go back to basics: knowledge, attitudes, and skills.

KNOWLEDGE  We actually know a lot about children and families. We know about the shape of the threats to their health and safety. We know the stark facts:

  • One in 5 US children lives in poverty1

  • The United States is 19th in infant mortality2(p17)

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