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October 1997

Sex Reassignment at Birth-Reply

Author Affiliations

Pacific Center for Sex and Society University of Hawaii–Manoa John A. Burns School of Medicine 1951 East-West Rd Honolulu, HI 96822
Department of Psychiatry 2255 Westbrook Mall Vancouver, British Columbia Canada V6T 2A1

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1997;151(10):1063. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1997.02170470096024

In our article,1 we limited our recommendation for treatment to those cases similar in nature, ie, individuals whose only medical situation was that of having a traumatic loss of the penis postnatally. Dr Benjamin asks for advice on management for a much broader spectrum of conditions. He asks for (1) advice for those cases most likely to confront the general practice physician, (2) how this case differs from those in which individuals who are born with normal genitalia request a change of sex, and (3) if the case originally reported is only of statistical interest. We respond to these questions in reverse order.

Cases of a neonate losing his penis due to trauma are exceedingly rare. The particular case reported is notable as it was initially taken as proof for a model of treatment by which cases of ambiguous genitalia came to be managed. From the original reports of

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