November 1997

QualityAn Elusive Goal With a Clear Path

Author Affiliations

The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health Baltimore, Md

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1997;151(11):1080-1081. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1997.02170480010001

ONCE UPON a time, while conducting a session on quality of care in a freshman course on ethics in medical care, a voice from the back row spoke: "I don't understand. We are the best in the country; we had to be to get into this medical school. And this medical school is the best in the country. Why are you lecturing us on quality of care?" Fortunately, a student today is unlikely to voice such a sentiment, although he (and it was a "he") might feel it. Every medical student now should know that quality concerns are real for everyone and we have come a long way toward assessing them for the purpose of improving practice.

See also page 1085

The article by Schuster et al1 carries us one step further in providing a tool for the trade—or, more accurately, a tool for the market. Carrying on a

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